On orthogonal specialization in C++: dealing with efficiency and algebraic abstraction in Vaucanson

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Abstract

Vaucanson is a C++ generic library for weighted finite state machine manipulation. For the sake of generality, FSM are defined using algebraic structures such as alphabet (for the letters), free monoid (for the words), semiring (for the weights) and series (mapping from words to weights). As usual, what is at stake is to maintain efficiency while providing a high-level layer for the writing of generic algorithms. Yet, one of the particularities of FSM manipulation is the need of a fine grained specialization power on an object which is both an algebraic concept and an intensive computing machine.

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Bibtex (lrde.bib)

@InProceedings{	  regisgianas.03.poosc,
  author	= {Yann R\'egis-Gianas and Rapha\"el Poss},
  title		= {On orthogonal specialization in {C++}: dealing with
		  efficiency and algebraic abstraction in {V}aucanson},
  booktitle	= {Proceedings of the Parallel/High-performance
		  Object-Oriented Scientific Computing (POOSC; in conjunction
		  with ECOOP)},
  year		= 2003,
  number	= {FZJ-ZAM-IB-2003-09},
  pages		= {71--82},
  editor	= {J\"org Striegnitz and Kei Davis},
  series	= {John von Neumann Institute for Computing (NIC)},
  address	= {Darmstadt, Germany},
  month		= jul,
  abstract	= {Vaucanson is a C++ generic library for weighted finite
		  state machine manipulation. For the sake of generality, FSM
		  are defined using algebraic structures such as alphabet
		  (for the letters), free monoid (for the words), semiring
		  (for the weights) and series (mapping from words to
		  weights). As usual, what is at stake is to maintain
		  efficiency while providing a high-level layer for the
		  writing of generic algorithms. Yet, one of the
		  particularities of FSM manipulation is the need of a fine
		  grained specialization power on an object which is both an
		  algebraic concept and an intensive computing machine.}
}